2 thoughts on “How did women prepare for inundation in Ancient Egypt?

  • October 25, 2010 at 12:18 am
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    People lived in villages raised above the flood-plain on an artificial mound, partly of earth, partly of the inhabitants’ rubbish compacted over centuries. These villages (the modern name is ‘tell’) became temporary islands during the flood period.

    While the farmers (the men) made sure that their animals and tools were safely removed to the tells, one imagines that the women would be doing much the same for the household: checking food stores, including bringing extra grain, if needed, from the state granary while it was still accessible; making sure that the children and the cats (very important sacred animals in ancient Egypt!) were not at risk of drowning by getting cut off in the fields and so on.

    We do not entirely know how labour was divided betweeen the sexes. Extant paintings seem to suggest that the men did most of the actual field work, while women concentrated on housekeeping and those productive activities which were centred on the home, which is reasonable since the women would normally have children to mind. This, however, still leaves open the possibility of a woman with her older children leading donkeys or oxen to their stable, as well as of course calling and carrying the family cats. After that it would be a matter of collecting the children and warning them not to play near the rising, swirling water of the flooding Nile.

  • October 25, 2010 at 12:18 am
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    Since someone already contributed a viable answer,here’s my take:

    They did not prepare at all, as they were "in da-nile" 😉

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