4 thoughts on “What would a typical lifestyle living in a Ancient Egypt home be like?

  • October 31, 2010 at 2:59 pm
    Permalink

    It wouldnt be much different to how the Fellahin live today, in mud & straw huts, living off the land as farmers, irrigating their land with water from the Nile, trading & so on………….

  • October 31, 2010 at 2:59 pm
    Permalink

    I am pretty sure they were really hard working people

  • October 31, 2010 at 2:59 pm
    Permalink

    Normal to rich Egyptians lived in colorful villas. Poor people and slaves lived in mud huts.

  • October 31, 2010 at 2:59 pm
    Permalink

    It depends on greatly, as it always has an always will anywhere in the world, what class you belong to, and whether you lived in the town or country. Although Egypt was an agriculture based economy, it was the most urbanised of the Ancient civilizations.

    Generally the nobility lived in comfortable town houses. These were large (sometimes very large, i.e dozens of rooms) houses spread over multiple floors with a central courtyard, pond, granary and silos. Since grain was a major de-facto currency, this was very important.

    The houses were mostly closed off to the street, except for one door. Windows were small and high up, much traditional middle eastern town houses, and there was division between private and "working" or reception space, and some homes had corridors allowing direct access to the main hall and courtyard, bypassing the private quarters.

    Houses had indoor bathing, washing and toilet areas. Construction was of plastered and decorated mudbrick and stone architectural elements (door lintels etc), often carved, with wall and ceiling paintings, and sometimes plastered floor paintings as well, sometimes inlaid with gemstones. Roofs were flat for extra space, and featured air cooling towers, semi circular domes angled into the prevailing wind to funnel cool air into the rooms below.

    Craftsmen on state projects had government provided accommodation of modest townhouses from 3-4 rooms upward, depending on rank. They could be of either dry stone or mudbrick, depending on the location and local materials. They featured a cellar for storage, no courtyard space, but flat roofs, again for extra space. Kitchens tended to be at the rear of the house and were built in back-to-back terraces. They usually existed in surprisingly close contact with the wealthier homes, and in only a few communities are they segregated. The main reception room generally featured a shrine, which in larger homes perhaps had a dedicated room(?)

    Commoners not in direct state employ tended to live in simple mudbrick homes. There is no evidence of reed huts, but this may be as limited evidence of towns within the floodplain, where such structures would be more likely have not survived so well. However, Egyptian artwork depicts structures of mudbrick most commonly, and a likely structure is a mudbrick house with a palm frond roof, as is seen widely in Egypt today. They probably didn’t have gemstone inlays, indoor bathing areas, ponds and painted floors.

    The Giza workers town featured what are believed to have been barracks, most likely for corvee workers who would have done a term of "national service" of several months on site, before returning to their own homes elsewhere. These featured large scale kitchens for organised, centralised provision of supplies.

    As for slaves, the archaeological and textual evidence concerning this is too sketchy to say anything with certainty.

Comments are closed.